Luka Chuppi Movie Review 2019: Games People Don’t Need To Play

If you like small town humour and find the premise fun, go play the game.

Luka Chuppi Movie Review 2019: Games People Don’t Need To Play Luka Chuppi Movie Review 2019: Games People Don’t Need To Play Source : Press


It's small-town North India once again. But commitment issues are universal.


Delhi-educated Rashmi Trivedi who's interning with a local channel in Mathura insists on a live-in relationship with boyfriend and senior anchor Guddu Shukla. She and Guddu have just shot an episode on relationships without marriage where a pandit points out that Krishna and Radha were the ultimate symbol of love but they were never married. Try that logic on Rashmi's father, Hindu hardliner Vishnu Trivedi, who's on a moral policing rampage with his political goons.


Undeterred by her father's politics, Rashmi and Guddu rent out a place in Gwalior when they're sent there for an assignment. Director Laxman Utekar tries hard to make it comic with nosey neighbours who peer into their house watch them making tea and being romantic, and decide that they're not married. Strange conclusions.


But Rashmi's and Guddu's married couple act is so convincing that his family hears about it and turns up.


With acceptance after bouts of comic protest from all quarters which includes a kid finding their strawberry-flavored condom, guilt sets in. Rashmi wants the saat pheras.


The laboured comedy shifts to their many attempts to get married which get thwarted. Until Rashmi speaks up that it was she who wanted the live-in arrangement.


Pankaj Tripathi as a womaniser who has a bone to pick with Guddu plays the loud, colourful character with flair. Kartik Aryan is pleasant as Guddu while Kriti Sanon passes off exaggerated expressions as acting.


There's a veiled denouncement of right-wing politics with Trivedi the fundamentalists targeting a Muslim superstar for not respecting the institution of marriage and spoiling traditional moral values. Emotions are whipped up with elections around the corner. If all that sounds familiar, the producers would like you to believe that they're entirely coincidental.


But politics is not the problem. Rashmi and Guddu falling in love is mechanical without any romantic moments or sizzling chemistry. Why Rashmi insists on a live-in arrangement or why she suddenly aspires for the sanctity of marriage or why they couldn't quietly go and get married somewhere are all areas that are taken for granted. They're ultimately situations enforced to evoke comedy.


Against loud background music, the concept of societal outrage over a live-in relationship is rather out of sync with current times.



But if you like small town humour and find the premise fun, go play the game.


Disclaimer: We are proud that LehrenTV reviewer Bharathi S Pradhan has been appointed an advisory member of the prestigious CBFC. However, her reviews reflect her personal appraisal of a film and do not in any way speak on behalf of the Censor Board.


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